THE NEILING II HOUSE: IN THE RUGGED WILDERNESS


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Categories: Homes / Dwellings

About 30 miles outside of Berlin, Germany the landscape gets a tad rural and monotonous. However, the rugged wilderness setting in this part of the country gave architect Peter Grundmann the chance to create a forest-dwelling that was both minimal in style but contemporary in form; suited to blend in with the landscape, not detract from its surroundings.

Dubbed the HouseNeiling II, it’s comprised totally from glass and wood, including a beautiful glass facade, a handful of homemade furniture and a custom bathroom and kitchen. The motivation for the project surrounds the ideas of an old barn, venturing into the territory of low-cost, prefabricated materials that yield a modern look. Inside, glazed walls and the open floor plan result in a bright living space complimented with brick, and stone interior with plywood furniture that feeds into the home’s rustic and warm aesthetic. There is a laundry room and pantry accessible through the home’s terrace as well, which features a sort of awning during the summer months once the weather becomes more indoor-outdoor friendly.

Rising from a rugged landscape, the Neiling II House manages to both stand out in its natural environment and complement the organic and wild beauty of the land which partly inspired its design. The glass and wood house was designed by Berlin-based architect Peter Grundmann in collaboration with ThomasPohl, who provided the glass facade,DIY furniture, and bathroom and kitchen fixtures.

The project is based around an old barn and explores the potential of low cost construction and the use of prefabricated components, yet you wouldn’t guess it by looking at the modern design. Glazed walls and open plan areas create a bright living space and link the interior to the natural landscape. Brick, natural stone and light plywood furniture are used throughout the interior, infusing the home with rustic warmth. The entire structure is elevated from the ground to maintain the land untouched and to eliminate the costs of excavation work.

The storage units, including a laundry room and pantry, are located in a separate area which is accessible only through the terrace. The minimal use of furniture and the addition of sliding doors that link the rooms enhance the airy atmosphere of the home and create the illusion of a larger house. During the warm summer months, the interior significantly expands as the covered terrace becomes a part of the living space.

via PeterGrundmann

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