The world’s largest Delta 3D printer can print nearly zero-cost housing out of mud


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Categories: Building Methods

The future of affordable (and sustainable) housing may lie with 3D printing. The World’s Advanced Saving Project (WASP) will soon unveil the world’s largest delta-style 3D printer that can build full-size buildings out of mud and clay for nearly zero cost. The massive 12-meter-tall (40 feet) BigDelta printer will make its official debut and show off its eco-friendly printing prowess tomorrow at “Reality of dream,” a three-day event in Massa Lombarda, Italy.

  

 

Italian innovator Massimo Moretti launched WASP with the goal to “create a means for affordable fabrication of homes, and provide these means to the locals in poverty stricken areas.” WASP’s affordable housing solution combines 3D printing with biomimicry, drawing inspiration from the mud dauber wasp that constructs its home from one of the world’s oldest building materials: mud. The choice of clay and mud inputs for the portable BigDelta was a conscious choice; although many 3D printers use cement, Moretti chose earth because of its low environmental footprint, local availability, and natural insulating benefits. Based on previous prototypes, the BigDelta will presumably build full-size houses using open-source software and a mixture of mud, clay, and plant fibers for reinforcement.

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