Ashwagandha Root: Herb of the ages


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Categories: Health & Nutrition

Here are 7 benefits women may experience with ashwagandha.

1. Promotes Graceful Aging

Stress, both metabolic and emotional, dramatically affects aging. Cortisol, the body’s stress hormone, contributes to muscle loss and weakness, wrinkles, and cognitive impairment. Research has found that ashwagandha improves resistance to stress, possibly decreasing cortisol production. [1] One study of 64 individuals observed a reduction in stress and a significant decrease in cortisol levels in individuals taking ashwagandha compared with placebo.

2. Menopausal Support

Ashwagandha acts on the endocrine system by encouraging hormone balance. A study involving 51 menopausal women supplementing with ashwagandha noted a significant reduction in symptoms such as hot flashes, anxiety, and mood. [2]

3. Sexual Potency

The Kama Sutra, one of the oldest surviving texts on human sexuality, mentions ashwagandha in its literature as a potent sexual stimulant. Research indicates that the herb supports sexual health and vitality by increasing blood flow and reducing bodily tension. Women taking ashwagandha typically experience an increase in sexual desire and satisfaction.

4. Memory Support

Recent research has shown that ashwagandha reduces memory impairment in animal models. The herb may also protect the brain from the oxidative stress that leads to neurodegeneration. Relaxation, a benefit derived from the herb’s stress-fighting effects, also improves long-term visual memory. [3] [4]

5. Revitalization

Another benefit many women report after taking this herb is in regards to energy levels. This anecdotal evidence is supported by scientific investigation; a recent study reported ashwagandha’s benefits for improving energy while reducing stress-related disorders. [5]

6. Mood Booster

Ashwagandha is a known mood-boosting herb, and research suggests that the therapeutic plant may play a potential role in fighting mood imbalance. [6] Women battling mood swings may benefit from supplementing with ashwaghanda.

7. Fertility

Stress, illness, hormone imbalance, and nutrient deficiencies — all of these issues threaten female reproductive health and make it difficult for a woman to conceive. Research shows that ashwagandha supports thyroid function, an organ responsible for regulating hormones. [7] Also, by decreasing stress, ashwagandha may encourage a situation that is optimal for fertility. [8] More research is needed to clarify whether or not ashwagandha is effective for helping infertile females struggling to conceive.

Using Ashwagandha Root
Ashwagandha can be found in liquid and capsule form, sometimes with other herbs designed to promote female health. Always look for an organic supplement that comes from a trusted, high-quality source.

What have your experiences been with ashwagandha supplementation? Let us know in the comments!

Watch an In-Depth Video on How to Balance Your Hormones Naturally
Video Length: 90 minutes

References:
Chandrasekhar K1, Kapoor J, Anishetty S. A prospective, randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled study of safety and efficacy of a high-concentration full-spectrum extract of ashwagandha root in reducing stress and anxiety in adults. Indian J Psychol Med. 2012 Jul;34(3):255-62. doi: 10.4103/0253-7176.106022.
Modi MB1, Donga SB, Dei L. Clinical evaluation of Ashokarishta, Ashwagandha Churna and Praval Pishti in the management of menopausal syndrome. Ayu. 2012 Oct;33(4):511-6. doi: 10.4103/0974-8520.110529.


R Archana, A Namasigayam. Antistressor effect of Withania somnifera. Journal of Ethnopharmacology. Volume 64, Issue 1, 1 January 1998, Pages 91-93.
Nava E, Landau D, Brody S, Linder L, Schächinger H. Mental relaxation improves long-term incidental visual memory. Neurobiology of Learning and Memory. 2004 May;81(3):167-71.
Narendra Singh, Mohit Bhalla, […], and Marilena Gilca. An Overview on Ashwagandha: A Rasayana (Rejuvenator) of Ayurveda. African Journal of Traditional, Complementary, and Alternative Medicines. 2011; 8(5 Suppl): 208-213.
Bhattacharya SK, Bhattacharya A, Sairam K, Ghosal S. Anxiolytic-antidepressant activity of Withania somnifera glycowithanolides: an experimental study. Phytomedicine. 2000 December;7(6):463-9.
Panda S, Kar A. Changes in thyroid hormone concentrations after administration of ashwagandha root extract to adult male mice. Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology. 1998 September;50(9):1065-8.
Wasser SK, Sewall G, Soules MR. Psychosocial stress as a cause of infertility. Fertility and Sterility. 1993 March;59(3):685-9.

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